Tuesday, 30 August 2011

KPMG get Inside the Business of Rugby World Cup


KPMG’s Rugby World Cup 2011 Lead Partner Godfrey Boyce, Rugby World Cup 1987 winner Grant Fox, CEO of RNZ2011 Martin Snedden and former Wallaby Peter FitzSimons outside KPMG’s Auckland office.
It's ‘Country over Cup’ for New Zealanders as KPMG get Inside the Business of Rugby World Cup 2011
KPMG’s campaign focuses on Inside the Business of Rugby World Cup 2011 and includes a dedicated website www.insidethebusiness.co.nz which aims to provide clients and rugby fans exclusive, intelligent insight into the Tournament.
A significant 84% of New Zealanders have let their heads rule their hearts and said that they would rather Rugby World Cup 2011 proved a success off the pitch than simply through an All Black victory, according to exclusive research released today by KPMG.  When faced with the choice of either ‘Cup or Country’, the majority of respondents defined a successful Tournament as one where New Zealand hosts a positive experience for visitors to the nation alongside defeat on the pitch, as opposed to pure success for the national team and New Zealand not providing an efficient and welcoming Tournament experience.   

The sentiment was echoed at an exclusive client debate hosted by KPMG at their Auckland office last night, which included former All Black Grant Fox, CEO of Tournament Organisers RNZ2011 Martin Snedden and current Assistant Coach of New Zealand Steve Hansen. The research was conducted by UMR amongst almost 900 New Zealanders nationwide earlier this month (before the two recent defeats on the pitch) and was commissioned by KPMG as part of their current Rugby World Cup 2011 campaign in their role as Official Suppliers of Accounting and Tax Advisory Services.  

Speaking at the event, KPMG’s Rugby World Cup 2011 Lead Partner, Godfrey Boyce, said, “The research has been fascinating.  It shows that despite the unrivalled passion and commitment to the national team here in New Zealand, Kiwis understand the once in a lifetime opportunity facing us here over the next few weeks.  Hopefully people won’t take that for granted and after an extremely tough year for the whole country, we need to make sure we engage with Rugby World Cup 2011 and use the event to lift the nation.  I am confident that even people who do not like rugby will connect with the Tournament and this fantastic experience.”

Rugby World Cup 1987 winner Grant Fox echoed Boyce’s belief saying, “This KPMG research shows that deep down we are a mature nation and know what is good for us.  I may be mellowing in my old age, but despite how much I would love New Zealand to win on 23rd October, the legacy from this Tournament is fundamentally important to the future of our country.  New Zealand has invested a lot in the next two months, and we have simply got to be great hosts, and ensure that every single visitor to New Zealand spreads the word about our great country to their friends and colleagues and returns.  I am really pleased that most people have differentiated between New Zealand success and the success of the Tournament itself.  Of course it will be the icing on the cake for me if we win the Cup, but for me the Country debate wins every time.”

Martin Snedden said, “Of course I want New Zealand to win it, but we have to make sure we do the job we have been given properly as host nation.  People will always be critical of the organisation and the so called problems affecting Rugby World Cup 2011, but just look at the evidence.  People said we couldn’t improve Eden Park in time, and it was ready a year out.  They said we couldn’t build a new stadium in Dunedin and we did, and they say we can’t sell tickets, but we have already sold ten times what we did for the 2005 British & Irish Lions Tour.  We had the massive impact – both physically and mentally – of the Christchurch earthquake and yet we moved the games, resold the tickets, and are still engaging with the people of Canterbury through a major festival programme.  

“Everyone is excited now, and I am really pleased that the research reflects that understanding of the significance of Rugby World Cup 2011 for us as a nation.”

Australian journalist and former Wallaby Peter FitzSimons was also interested in the KPMG findings, but acknowledged the pressure on the host team to perform.  “There is no question amongst Australians that New Zealand will be great hosts,” he said, “But don’t discount the fact that the New Zealand team needs to do well when it comes to judging the event a success.  When Australia hosted the Olympic Games in 2000, a huge factor in the definition of success was the number of gold medals we, as the hosts, won.  It shouldn’t be a factor, but it will be.  It is the sad truth that many people, especially within the media, will judge the success of Rugby World Cup 2011 on the performance of New Zealand.”

KPMG’s campaign focuses on Inside the Business of Rugby World Cup 2011 and includes a dedicated website www.insidethebusiness.co.nz which aims to provide clients and rugby fans exclusive, intelligent insight into the Tournament.

For more information about KPMG and their Rugby World Cup 2011 campaign please contact Angela Hayes, External Relations Manager, KPMG, Auckland, New Zealand on 021 243 8997, 09 363 3590 or angelahayes@kpmg.co.nz

For more information on the UMR research for KPMG please contact Gavin White from UMR on 027 543 7164 / 04 473 1061.

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